</iframe> Adapters and Converters Standard electricity in Belize is between 110v and 220v, which is similar to the US, so if your appliances come from the US you will not need a power converter. The sockets and plugs in Belize differ from the US. The power sockets that are used are of types B/G (sometimes A). Many US appliances use type B but type G is is not used in the US. To be on the safe side you will want to bring an adapter with you. Click here for additional information. WiFi vs. International Phones International cell phone options vary depending on your individual wants and needs. Some students choose to disconnect from their home using only local WiFi to keep in touch, while others want to use their phone to keep in touch with family and friends, post to Instagram, Facebook, or surf the web. Be sure to talk with your family before choosing an option.  International Cell Phone Plans You can use your own cell phone with an international calling plan. These plans vary depending on your cell phone provider. These plans can be complex so be sure to call your provider for detailed information such as roaming charges, international dialing and receiving of calls and international sending and receiving of texts.  International Sim Cards Purchasing an international or global sim card allows you to use your own cell phone at reduced rates around the world. Sim cards are best for travelers who are either visiting many countries and/or going to be in a country for a short period of time. You will keep your own cell phone number, have access to voice, text, and data, but spend less on your call service. You pay as you go and reload your sim card when you need to. In order to do this option, you must have a GSM carrier unlocked cellphone for the sim card to work. To find out if you can unlock your cellphone you must contact your cell phone provider. Buying or Renting an International Phone Another option is to buy or rent a cellphone for your time abroad. There are many services that offer cell phone plans from basic, very inexpensive cell phones to expensive smartphones.  Below are a few websites where you can purchase and international cell phone. Keep in mind there are tons of sites for you to find a phone. Make sure they are legitimate sites (read the reviews). Mobal Telestial StaTravel Wifi and Apps Turning off your cell phones data and roaming and relying on WiFi is the cheapest way to keep in touch with family and friends. However, with this option you do not have the ability to google directions, food or find a place to listen to a live band. Students can also use WiFi, which us usually available in large chain cafes, hotels, hostels and some restaurants. There are many apps you can use to communicate with family and friends such as Skype, WhatsApp, Viber, Facebook Messenger, Line and more. Weather One of the nicest things about visiting Belize is the weather. With an average yearly temperature of 84° F (29°C), it’s always warm, yet comfortable. Costal sea breezes as well as our jungle and rainforests keep you cool even in the hottest summer months while winters can be cool but never very cold. In short, the climate is pretty much near perfect. Even in winter (November-March) the temperature in Belize rarely falls below 60°F (16°C), while the summer (May-September) is around 86°F (30°C). Humidity is also fairly consistent at around 85 percent. Belize’s dry season is between February and May and has significantly lower rainfall than the rest of the year. When it does rain, it is usually in mild, short bursts. June through December is our wet season, when parts of the country receive up to 150 inches of rain and the heavy, sometimes wild storms associated with the Caribbean occur, usually in the late afternoons. The most frequent rainfall usually happens in June or early July and is punctuated by a break in late July or August known as the "little dry." We also have a hurricane season, and while statistically Belize does not attract many major direct hits, it does get its share of severe tropical weather with high winds and rain. However, we have cooperative early warning network that we share with our neighbors. Our safety, evacuation and other procedures have proven to be effective, so no worries.   Attire Shirts: Cotton or light material, short-sleeved or light long-sleeved Trousers: Jeans or light hiking pants. Shorts can be worn in all places EXCEPT TOWN Head wear: Light hat with wide brim, including back of neck, for sun protection. Tie under the chin is advisable to prevent possible loss due to wind on boats. Bad Weather Gear: Poncho, small folding umbrella can be useful while walking trails or in boats. Light- weight jacket or wind breaker for nights in the mountains or boat rides. A heavy cotton sweat shirt can be substituted for a windbreaker and feels great on the boat after snorkeling. Shoes: Trails are often wet and therefore slippery, so your footwear is important. Walking shoes that grip or two pairs of tennis shoes (in case one pair gets wet and muddy). Flip-flops. NOTE: Most landings on islands are wet landings and we recommend always wearing shoes in the field Swimsuit: An extra swimsuit may be helpful. Sunscreen!!! Very hot, so reapplying is a must! Health & Safety Your health and safety are Pace International's top priority and it should be yours as well. Always be aware of your surroundings, travel in pairs and when you are out at night, stick to licensed taxi’s only. Always have your identification, your insurance card, your hotel card, a debit or credit card, and some cash on you at all times. Do not carry your passport with you unless specified by your professor. Keep your passport, large sums of money, prescription medication, any important documentation and electronics in your hotel room, preferably in a safe at all times. While walking around Belize, be conscious of your belongings.  Pickpocketing and mugging is unfortunately very common in crowded, touristy areas. Pickpockets are usually experienced and you will not know something was taken until possibly hours later. To avoid getting your personal items stolen, wear bags with small locks for the zippers, keep your important documents in a separate compartment from everything else, and do not keep anything valuable in your pockets. You may also want to invest in a money belt. Culture Before traveling to a new country, it is important to do your research. Learn about the history, politics, dress, language, norms, faux pas, food, etc. This can be accomplished with a quick google search. Below are some examples of the Belizean culture that are important to know before departing on your study abroad program. Language In Belize you’ll hear familiar words of the English language. In fact, we are the only English language-speaking country in Central America. While English is the official language of Belize, Kriol is the language that we all speak. When you hear us, you know you’re in a country unlike any other. Even our most up-tight citizens sound relaxed. We have a Caribbean lilt and our words seem a bit shorter. But don’t worry, you’ll understand everything and we may teach you a few phrases you don’t know. Here, even our language is a diverse adventure. Spanish, African-based Garifuna, Maya-Kekchi, Maya Mopan, Mandarin, German are just a few of the languages that form the unique dialects we speak throughout the country. Here are a few different ways you’ll hear “good morning” • “Gud Mawnin” – Kriol • “Buiti Binafi” – Garifuna • “Buenos dias” – Spanish   Food Belizeans just love peppers and hot (pepper) sauce: habanero's and jalapenos, the hotter the better! Rice and red beans with grated coconut Corn and chicken tamales or tamalitos, commonly called "dukunu" meats: iguana or "gibnut", pork, beef, chicken fish Side dishes are generally potato salad made from real Heinz salad dressing, the key ingredient that makes Belizean potato salad "Belijun", or coleslaw. enchiladas and panades Desert: coconut pie, lemon (merengue) pie, milk (caramel cake) and chocolate cake, bread pudding, sweet potato pound or cassava cake.   Norms and Faux Pas If you invite someone to dinner, don't expect to split the bill Learn to relax - slow down It's normal for everything to start late It's not cool to dance with someone's gf/ bf Don't turn down a drink or plate of food Don't assume everyone can read and write properly. Local Transportation Common modes of transportation in Belize are buses, taxis, private vehicles, motorcycles, and just walking.  For this trip, a private vehicle will be provided for students' mode of transportation      Packing Helpful Hints Remember that everything you pack you will need to carry. If you are unable to carry it on your own, then you are packing too much! Leave some room for any new items you may purchase while abroad. Inquire about airline luggage regulations and pack accordingly. Find out about dress customs in your destination and pack clothes that will help you blend-in with the locals. Pack a nice outfit for special occasions. Do not pack anything that you are not willing to lose. If you are going to a place where the temperature will vary, pack clothes that you can layer. Pack clothes that don’t require special wash. You will probably walk more than the usual, bring comfortable shoes! In some destinations closed-toes shoes may be recommended due to possible injuries or infections. Power adaptors and converters as applicable http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/world-electricity-guide.html If you know your roommate, see if you can share some items. Shower shoes Camera Backpack or tote bag for day field trips Find out if you really need to bring a laptop. Keep in mind that a laptop can be stolen, so you may need to carry with you at all times. Cell phone Things to pack in your carry-on: Follow airline customs and regulations http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/3-1-1-carry-ons Passport Visa (if applicable) Financial documents Airline tickets (round trip) Letter of acceptance in your study abroad program Address where you will need to go as well as arrival instructions Important phone number(s) Prescription medications appropriately packed and identified Glasses/contacts Toiletries and a change of clothes in case of baggage or flight delays Cell Phone Pocket Dictionary Flight Resources Flying internationally can be an expensive purchase. As a student there are many discounts you can take advantage of. Remember to do your research and compare prices. If you have a credit card that as a point system, you may be able to use those points towards your airplane ticket.   Below are some websites we feel have the best prices for student travelers: STA Travel  Student Universe  Parent Resources Student Identity Keeping in Touch Keeping in touch with family and friends is becoming easier as WiFi is more prevalent in international cities. You no longer need to spent a ton of money to call home or go to an internet café. Downloading apps on your smartphone is becoming an essential resource for travelers. Some apps that you will find yourself needing: Skype Whatsapp Viber Facebook Messenger  Money Money, money, money… It is an important component to your study abroad program to have all your money matters taken care of before departing. From contacting your banks, to creating a budget and obtaining local currency, this is a step you should begin as early as possible.   It is important to contact your banks to let them know you are traveling internationally and for how long. If you do not let your banks know, not only will you not be able to use your credit cards or debit cards, your accounts will be frozen. Unfreezing accounts take time, time in which you will not have any money available for you to use.   Creating a budget for yourself is essential to not running out of money abroad and having to call friends or family for additional funds. Below is a budget worksheet to help you stay on track with your money.   Taking your credit card abroad is very common and probably the easiest way to make a purchase. Be aware of interest rates and international charges. Some credit cards charge you a lot for a single purchase while others have no international transaction fees. Call your bank to find out what the international transaction fee is on your card. Please note: International cards vary by card, not by company. For example, some Chase cards have zero fees, while another may have a very large fee. Read the guidelines carefully before deciding on a card.   Make sure your credit card has a designated pin number. You will need a pin number to make any purchase. If you do not have a pin, or if you are unsure, a quick call to your bank will clear up any confusion.   Currency exchange rates can be high and the interest rate at many shops, especially near or in airports or train station, can really hurt your budget. You will generally receive the best exchange rate at your bank. You should being $100 to $200 dollars in the local currency with you. Some banks have the most popular currency, like Euros on hand, while others have to be ordered. This process can take up to 2 or 3 weeks so be sure to do this in advance. If and when you need more cash, an ATM is your best option, but again be aware of transaction fees. Not only will the bank whose ATM you are using charge you, your bank will most likely charge you as well.   Below are a list of international credit cards we suggest: Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card BankAmericard Travel Rewards® Credit Card Discover it® 12:12 Wells Fargo Propel World American Express Citi ThankYou® Premier Card Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business (all Capital One cards have zero international transaction fees - these are our favorite) "> </iframe> Adapters and Converters Standard electricity in Belize is between 110v and 220v, which is similar to the US, so if your appliances come from the US you will not need a power converter. The sockets and plugs in Belize differ from the US. The power sockets that are used are of types B/G (sometimes A). Many US appliances use type B but type G is is not used in the US. To be on the safe side you will want to bring an adapter with you. Click here for additional information. WiFi vs. International Phones International cell phone options vary depending on your individual wants and needs. Some students choose to disconnect from their home using only local WiFi to keep in touch, while others want to use their phone to keep in touch with family and friends, post to Instagram, Facebook, or surf the web. Be sure to talk with your family before choosing an option.  International Cell Phone Plans You can use your own cell phone with an international calling plan. These plans vary depending on your cell phone provider. These plans can be complex so be sure to call your provider for detailed information such as roaming charges, international dialing and receiving of calls and international sending and receiving of texts.  International Sim Cards Purchasing an international or global sim card allows you to use your own cell phone at reduced rates around the world. Sim cards are best for travelers who are either visiting many countries and/or going to be in a country for a short period of time. You will keep your own cell phone number, have access to voice, text, and data, but spend less on your call service. You pay as you go and reload your sim card when you need to. In order to do this option, you must have a GSM carrier unlocked cellphone for the sim card to work. To find out if you can unlock your cellphone you must contact your cell phone provider. Buying or Renting an International Phone Another option is to buy or rent a cellphone for your time abroad. There are many services that offer cell phone plans from basic, very inexpensive cell phones to expensive smartphones.  Below are a few websites where you can purchase and international cell phone. Keep in mind there are tons of sites for you to find a phone. Make sure they are legitimate sites (read the reviews). Mobal Telestial StaTravel Wifi and Apps Turning off your cell phones data and roaming and relying on WiFi is the cheapest way to keep in touch with family and friends. However, with this option you do not have the ability to google directions, food or find a place to listen to a live band. Students can also use WiFi, which us usually available in large chain cafes, hotels, hostels and some restaurants. There are many apps you can use to communicate with family and friends such as Skype, WhatsApp, Viber, Facebook Messenger, Line and more. Weather One of the nicest things about visiting Belize is the weather. With an average yearly temperature of 84° F (29°C), it’s always warm, yet comfortable. Costal sea breezes as well as our jungle and rainforests keep you cool even in the hottest summer months while winters can be cool but never very cold. In short, the climate is pretty much near perfect. Even in winter (November-March) the temperature in Belize rarely falls below 60°F (16°C), while the summer (May-September) is around 86°F (30°C). Humidity is also fairly consistent at around 85 percent. Belize’s dry season is between February and May and has significantly lower rainfall than the rest of the year. When it does rain, it is usually in mild, short bursts. June through December is our wet season, when parts of the country receive up to 150 inches of rain and the heavy, sometimes wild storms associated with the Caribbean occur, usually in the late afternoons. The most frequent rainfall usually happens in June or early July and is punctuated by a break in late July or August known as the "little dry." We also have a hurricane season, and while statistically Belize does not attract many major direct hits, it does get its share of severe tropical weather with high winds and rain. However, we have cooperative early warning network that we share with our neighbors. Our safety, evacuation and other procedures have proven to be effective, so no worries.   Attire Shirts: Cotton or light material, short-sleeved or light long-sleeved Trousers: Jeans or light hiking pants. Shorts can be worn in all places EXCEPT TOWN Head wear: Light hat with wide brim, including back of neck, for sun protection. Tie under the chin is advisable to prevent possible loss due to wind on boats. Bad Weather Gear: Poncho, small folding umbrella can be useful while walking trails or in boats. Light- weight jacket or wind breaker for nights in the mountains or boat rides. A heavy cotton sweat shirt can be substituted for a windbreaker and feels great on the boat after snorkeling. Shoes: Trails are often wet and therefore slippery, so your footwear is important. Walking shoes that grip or two pairs of tennis shoes (in case one pair gets wet and muddy). Flip-flops. NOTE: Most landings on islands are wet landings and we recommend always wearing shoes in the field Swimsuit: An extra swimsuit may be helpful. Sunscreen!!! Very hot, so reapplying is a must! Health & Safety Your health and safety are Pace International's top priority and it should be yours as well. Always be aware of your surroundings, travel in pairs and when you are out at night, stick to licensed taxi’s only. Always have your identification, your insurance card, your hotel card, a debit or credit card, and some cash on you at all times. Do not carry your passport with you unless specified by your professor. Keep your passport, large sums of money, prescription medication, any important documentation and electronics in your hotel room, preferably in a safe at all times. While walking around Belize, be conscious of your belongings.  Pickpocketing and mugging is unfortunately very common in crowded, touristy areas. Pickpockets are usually experienced and you will not know something was taken until possibly hours later. To avoid getting your personal items stolen, wear bags with small locks for the zippers, keep your important documents in a separate compartment from everything else, and do not keep anything valuable in your pockets. You may also want to invest in a money belt. Culture Before traveling to a new country, it is important to do your research. Learn about the history, politics, dress, language, norms, faux pas, food, etc. This can be accomplished with a quick google search. Below are some examples of the Belizean culture that are important to know before departing on your study abroad program. Language In Belize you’ll hear familiar words of the English language. In fact, we are the only English language-speaking country in Central America. While English is the official language of Belize, Kriol is the language that we all speak. When you hear us, you know you’re in a country unlike any other. Even our most up-tight citizens sound relaxed. We have a Caribbean lilt and our words seem a bit shorter. But don’t worry, you’ll understand everything and we may teach you a few phrases you don’t know. Here, even our language is a diverse adventure. Spanish, African-based Garifuna, Maya-Kekchi, Maya Mopan, Mandarin, German are just a few of the languages that form the unique dialects we speak throughout the country. Here are a few different ways you’ll hear “good morning” • “Gud Mawnin” – Kriol • “Buiti Binafi” – Garifuna • “Buenos dias” – Spanish   Food Belizeans just love peppers and hot (pepper) sauce: habanero's and jalapenos, the hotter the better! Rice and red beans with grated coconut Corn and chicken tamales or tamalitos, commonly called "dukunu" meats: iguana or "gibnut", pork, beef, chicken fish Side dishes are generally potato salad made from real Heinz salad dressing, the key ingredient that makes Belizean potato salad "Belijun", or coleslaw. enchiladas and panades Desert: coconut pie, lemon (merengue) pie, milk (caramel cake) and chocolate cake, bread pudding, sweet potato pound or cassava cake.   Norms and Faux Pas If you invite someone to dinner, don't expect to split the bill Learn to relax - slow down It's normal for everything to start late It's not cool to dance with someone's gf/ bf Don't turn down a drink or plate of food Don't assume everyone can read and write properly. Local Transportation Common modes of transportation in Belize are buses, taxis, private vehicles, motorcycles, and just walking.  For this trip, a private vehicle will be provided for students' mode of transportation      Packing Helpful Hints Remember that everything you pack you will need to carry. If you are unable to carry it on your own, then you are packing too much! Leave some room for any new items you may purchase while abroad. Inquire about airline luggage regulations and pack accordingly. Find out about dress customs in your destination and pack clothes that will help you blend-in with the locals. Pack a nice outfit for special occasions. Do not pack anything that you are not willing to lose. If you are going to a place where the temperature will vary, pack clothes that you can layer. Pack clothes that don’t require special wash. You will probably walk more than the usual, bring comfortable shoes! In some destinations closed-toes shoes may be recommended due to possible injuries or infections. Power adaptors and converters as applicable http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/world-electricity-guide.html If you know your roommate, see if you can share some items. Shower shoes Camera Backpack or tote bag for day field trips Find out if you really need to bring a laptop. Keep in mind that a laptop can be stolen, so you may need to carry with you at all times. Cell phone Things to pack in your carry-on: Follow airline customs and regulations http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/3-1-1-carry-ons Passport Visa (if applicable) Financial documents Airline tickets (round trip) Letter of acceptance in your study abroad program Address where you will need to go as well as arrival instructions Important phone number(s) Prescription medications appropriately packed and identified Glasses/contacts Toiletries and a change of clothes in case of baggage or flight delays Cell Phone Pocket Dictionary Flight Resources Flying internationally can be an expensive purchase. As a student there are many discounts you can take advantage of. Remember to do your research and compare prices. If you have a credit card that as a point system, you may be able to use those points towards your airplane ticket.   Below are some websites we feel have the best prices for student travelers: STA Travel  Student Universe  Parent Resources Student Identity Keeping in Touch Keeping in touch with family and friends is becoming easier as WiFi is more prevalent in international cities. You no longer need to spent a ton of money to call home or go to an internet café. Downloading apps on your smartphone is becoming an essential resource for travelers. Some apps that you will find yourself needing: Skype Whatsapp Viber Facebook Messenger  Money Money, money, money… It is an important component to your study abroad program to have all your money matters taken care of before departing. From contacting your banks, to creating a budget and obtaining local currency, this is a step you should begin as early as possible.   It is important to contact your banks to let them know you are traveling internationally and for how long. If you do not let your banks know, not only will you not be able to use your credit cards or debit cards, your accounts will be frozen. Unfreezing accounts take time, time in which you will not have any money available for you to use.   Creating a budget for yourself is essential to not running out of money abroad and having to call friends or family for additional funds. Below is a budget worksheet to help you stay on track with your money.   Taking your credit card abroad is very common and probably the easiest way to make a purchase. Be aware of interest rates and international charges. Some credit cards charge you a lot for a single purchase while others have no international transaction fees. Call your bank to find out what the international transaction fee is on your card. Please note: International cards vary by card, not by company. For example, some Chase cards have zero fees, while another may have a very large fee. Read the guidelines carefully before deciding on a card.   Make sure your credit card has a designated pin number. You will need a pin number to make any purchase. If you do not have a pin, or if you are unsure, a quick call to your bank will clear up any confusion.   Currency exchange rates can be high and the interest rate at many shops, especially near or in airports or train station, can really hurt your budget. You will generally receive the best exchange rate at your bank. You should being $100 to $200 dollars in the local currency with you. Some banks have the most popular currency, like Euros on hand, while others have to be ordered. This process can take up to 2 or 3 weeks so be sure to do this in advance. If and when you need more cash, an ATM is your best option, but again be aware of transaction fees. Not only will the bank whose ATM you are using charge you, your bank will most likely charge you as well.   Below are a list of international credit cards we suggest: Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card BankAmericard Travel Rewards® Credit Card Discover it® 12:12 Wells Fargo Propel World American Express Citi ThankYou® Premier Card Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business (all Capital One cards have zero international transaction fees - these are our favorite) "/> Skip to content

Programs : Brochure

This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
Fact Sheet:
Language of Instruction:
English Minimum GPA: 3.0
Area of Study: Nursing Eligible Year: 3 Junior, 4 Senior
Program Type: Faculty-led
Program Description:
changepacebelize

Belize 2017


Overview

Service Learning over the Winter Session
Dates Abroad: January 7 - 15, 2017 


The University at Buffalo School of Nursing offers a winter session Service-Learning Trip to Belize. This interactive course prepares students to care for the global population. Students will travel abroad and perform nursing care in both the village and hospital settings under the instruction of the nursing faculty as well as visiting the local hospital and the University of Belize School of Nursing.  This trip prepares students to care for the global population and examine factors that contribute to health disparities and their impact on the global community, encouraging students to further develop the skills of advocacy, collaboration, cultural competency and ethical decision-making.  

This two credit course examines the various factors that contribute to health disparities and their impact upon the global community, encouraging students to further develop the skills of advocacy, collaboration, cultural competency and ethical decision-making.

Information on the Belize Study Abroad Program

The Belize Experience takes place January 7-15, 2017 during the winter break. Students meet the week prior to departure for Belize in-person on campus to review preparations for this experience. This course consists of orientation sessions that include an overview of the history, culture, and healthcare system of Belize.  Online modules will be completed during the first week of the January intercession.   Students will care for patients in Belize in village, clinic, and home settings under the supervision of UB Nursing faculty.   Students will also attend workshops on topics such as tropical diseases, immerse themselves in the culture of Belize, and balance the hard work with recreational experiences found in Belize. 
Upon returning to the United States, students will present a final project during the third week of January upon returning from Belize. This includes written and video assignments.  This final presentation may be presented through remote access/videoconferencing.

Eligible students include those enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program or intended or pre-nursing majors.  Non-University at Buffalo students who wish to apply are required to submit a transcript indicating academic good standing. 


Academics

If approved, students will be registered for two SUNY credits. Students must meet with their Pace academic advisor prior to committing to this course.

Eligibility
  • Nursing majors only
  • 3.0 GPA
  • Good disciplinary and academic standing
  • Recommendation letter
  • Faculty approval

Housing

Students will be housed in a local hotel (2-3 students per room) and will also enjoy one overnight stay at the beach in Caye Caulker.
 

Meet your Faculty Leader

Belize Service Learning Contacts

Joann Sands, Clinical Assistant Professor  
Email: jsnyder@buffalo.edu
Phone: 716-829-2342

Jennifer Guay, Clinical Assistant Professor
Phone: 716-829-3882
Email: jmguay@buffalo.edu

Program Cost and Itinerary

The program fee of $1,795 includes:
  • Hotel accommodations (2-3 students per room); students will also enjoy an overnight stay at the beach in Caye Caulker
  • Two meals per day.       
  • Cultural visits.
  • In-country transportation/airport transfers.
  • UB Study Abroad administrative fees; emergency evacuation fees; international service learning fees.
  • Some student stipends may be available to help offset the cost.
 

Payments and Deadlines

All payments must be completed by the stated deadlines below.

Application fee: $85 due at time of application (deducted from total program fee)

Required deposit of $200 (deducted from total program fee)

2017 estimated program fee $1,795  (in addition to SUNY tuition, $100 study abroad fee, and flight). **subject to change**


Participants are responsible for round trip airfare to Belize, one meal per day, miscellaneous personal expenses, any passport fees, any optional trip and/or health insurance. [Approximate total: $1,500]
 

How to Apply

All applications are submitted through the University of Buffalo.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: TBA
APPLICATION/REGISTRATION FEE: $85

To apply, visit the University of Buffalo Study Abroad page.
click on the "apply" tab at the top or bottom of this page. Be sure to read all information carefully, as each program has different requirements and instructions.

For most programs it will take 2-3 weeks after the application deadline has passed to know if you’ve been offered a spot on the program. This will vary depending on the type of program.
After the initial application has been processed by Pace Study Abroad, students will receive an e-mail regarding their application status and instructions on the next steps including program specific applications.

Cancellation Policy

Please be advised of the Pace University Cancellation Policy below:

"I hereby acknowledge that the University reserves the right to make cancellations, changes or substitutions to the program at any time and for any reason, with or without notice, and that the University shall not be liable for any loss whatsoever to program participants as a result of such cancellations, changes, or substitutions. I understand that the University reserves the right to cancel, terminate, and/or discontinue the program at any time. Any refund of tuition and fees, if appropriate, shall be issued pursuant to the University’s and University program’s policies. "

Passport and Visa

It is important to obtain the necessary documents before you depart for your study abroad program. In order to cross international borders, you must be able to prove your identity and nationality.

What is a Passport?
A passport is a document issued by your national government that certifies your identity and nationality for the purpose of international travel.  Almost all international travel requires that you have and carry a passport. Your passport must be valid for at least 6 months after re-entry to the United States.
 
For citizens of the United States, passports are issued by the US Department of State and provides many uses:
  • When presented abroad, it is a request to foreign governments to permit you to travel or temporarily reside in their territories and access all lawful local aid and protection.
  • It allows you access to US Consular services and assistance while abroad.
  • It allows you to re-enter the United States upon your return home. 
It is important not to confuse a Passport Book with a Passport Card. A Passport Book is valid for international travel by air, sea, or land. A Passport Card is valid when entering the US from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda at land border crossing or sea ports-of-entry. A Passport Card is not valid for international travel by air.
 
How Do I Apply for a Passport?
First time applicants should follow the instructions listed on the State Department’s website. Applicants must bring their completed application, photos, required documents, and form of payment to one of many acceptance offices, which can be found using the State Department's passport acceptance facility search page.
 
Those looking to renew an adult passport should follow the instructions listed on the State Department’s website. For citizens over 16 years of age, a passport is valid for 10 years.
 
The fee to receive or renew a passport is available on the State Department's full chart of costs. It generally takes 4 to 6 weeks to process, so apply for a passport as soon as possible. You could expedite the services at an additional charge.
 
What is a Visa?
A citizen of a foreign country who seeks to enter another country generally must first visa, which is placed in the traveler’s passport and allows you to travel to, from, and within that particular country or region legally.
Countries typically break visas down into types that reflect the purpose of your visit—tourism, studying, and working, among many potential others.
 
Each visa has different requirements necessary to obtain them depending on country, type, duration and nationality of the applicant. A country’s consular office should be able to provide you with a list of requirements based on these factors.
 
A visa is a privilege, not a right. A consular office may deny your visa application, so it is best to adhere to their requirements as much as possible.
 
How Do I Apply for a Visa?
Obtaining a visa is your responsibility. It is important that you know what is required of you before attempting to enter a country. Failing to obtain a visa (or the correct visa) could result in a denial of entry into a country, and even criminal charges.
 
You can find the most up-to-date visa information by contacting the consulate or embassy of your host country. US Citizens can also find current visa information on the US State Department website.
 
Non-resident students must reach out to International Students and Scholars Services (ISSS) by emailing intlnyc@pace.edu.
  • Check if you will be able to keep your SEVIS record active while participating in the study abroad program.
  • Inquire about re-entry to the US at the completion of your program. Will you need to renew your US visa? Will your travel signature be valid?
  • If it will be your final semester, ask whether study abroad will impact your ability to apply for Optional Practical Training (F-1s). 


thingstoknowbelize

Currency

The official currency of Belize is the Belize Dollar (BZD)

Visit Oanda.com for more information.

Adapters and Converters

Standard electricity in Belize is between 110v and 220v, which is similar to the US, so if your appliances come from the US you will not need a power converter. The sockets and plugs in Belize differ from the US. The power sockets that are used are of types B/G (sometimes A). Many US appliances use type B but type G is is not used in the US. To be on the safe side you will want to bring an adapter with you.

Click here for additional information.

WiFi vs. International Phones

International cell phone options vary depending on your individual wants and needs. Some students choose to disconnect from their home using only local WiFi to keep in touch, while others want to use their phone to keep in touch with family and friends, post to Instagram, Facebook, or surf the web. Be sure to talk with your family before choosing an option. 

International Cell Phone Plans
You can use your own cell phone with an international calling plan. These plans vary depending on your cell phone provider. These plans can be complex so be sure to call your provider for detailed information such as roaming charges, international dialing and receiving of calls and international sending and receiving of texts. 

International Sim Cards
Purchasing an international or global sim card allows you to use your own cell phone at reduced rates around the world. Sim cards are best for travelers who are either visiting many countries and/or going to be in a country for a short period of time. You will keep your own cell phone number, have access to voice, text, and data, but spend less on your call service. You pay as you go and reload your sim card when you need to. In order to do this option, you must have a GSM carrier unlocked cellphone for the sim card to work. To find out if you can unlock your cellphone you must contact your cell phone provider.

Buying or Renting an International Phone
Another option is to buy or rent a cellphone for your time abroad. There are many services that offer cell phone plans from basic, very inexpensive cell phones to expensive smartphones. 
Below are a few websites where you can purchase and international cell phone. Keep in mind there are tons of sites for you to find a phone. Make sure they are legitimate sites (read the reviews).

Mobal
Telestial
StaTravel

Wifi and Apps
Turning off your cell phones data and roaming and relying on WiFi is the cheapest way to keep in touch with family and friends. However, with this option you do not have the ability to google directions, food or find a place to listen to a live band. Students can also use WiFi, which us usually available in large chain cafes, hotels, hostels and some restaurants. There are many apps you can use to communicate with family and friends such as Skype, WhatsApp, Viber, Facebook Messenger, Line and more.

Weather

One of the nicest things about visiting Belize is the weather. With an average yearly temperature of 84° F (29°C), it’s always warm, yet comfortable. Costal sea breezes as well as our jungle and rainforests keep you cool even in the hottest summer months while winters can be cool but never very cold. In short, the climate is pretty much near perfect. Even in winter (November-March) the temperature in Belize rarely falls below 60°F (16°C), while the summer (May-September) is around 86°F (30°C). Humidity is also fairly consistent at around 85 percent.

Belize’s dry season is between February and May and has significantly lower rainfall than the rest of the year. When it does rain, it is usually in mild, short bursts.

June through December is our wet season, when parts of the country receive up to 150 inches of rain and the heavy, sometimes wild storms associated with the Caribbean occur, usually in the late afternoons. The most frequent rainfall usually happens in June or early July and is punctuated by a break in late July or August known as the "little dry."

We also have a hurricane season, and while statistically Belize does not attract many major direct hits, it does get its share of severe tropical weather with high winds and rain. However, we have cooperative early warning network that we share with our neighbors. Our safety, evacuation and other procedures have proven to be effective, so no worries.
 

Attire

  • Shirts: Cotton or light material, short-sleeved or light long-sleeved
  • Trousers: Jeans or light hiking pants. Shorts can be worn in all places EXCEPT TOWN
  • Head wear: Light hat with wide brim, including back of neck, for sun protection. Tie under the chin is advisable to prevent possible loss due to wind on boats.
  • Bad Weather Gear: Poncho, small folding umbrella can be useful while walking trails or in boats. Light- weight jacket or wind breaker for nights in the mountains or boat rides. A heavy cotton sweat shirt can be substituted for a windbreaker and feels great on the boat after snorkeling.
  • Shoes: Trails are often wet and therefore slippery, so your footwear is important. Walking shoes that grip or two pairs of tennis shoes (in case one pair gets wet and muddy). Flip-flops. NOTE: Most landings on islands are wet landings and we recommend always wearing shoes in the field
  • Swimsuit: An extra swimsuit may be helpful.
  • Sunscreen!!! Very hot, so reapplying is a must!

Health & Safety

Your health and safety are Pace International's top priority and it should be yours as well. Always be aware of your surroundings, travel in pairs and when you are out at night, stick to licensed taxi’s only. Always have your identification, your insurance card, your hotel card, a debit or credit card, and some cash on you at all times. Do not carry your passport with you unless specified by your professor. Keep your passport, large sums of money, prescription medication, any important documentation and electronics in your hotel room, preferably in a safe at all times.

While walking around Belize, be conscious of your belongings.  Pickpocketing and mugging is unfortunately very common in crowded, touristy areas. Pickpockets are usually experienced and you will not know something was taken until possibly hours later. To avoid getting your personal items stolen, wear bags with small locks for the zippers, keep your important documents in a separate compartment from everything else, and do not keep anything valuable in your pockets. You may also want to invest in a money belt.

Culture

Before traveling to a new country, it is important to do your research. Learn about the history, politics, dress, language, norms, faux pas, food, etc. This can be accomplished with a quick google search. Below are some examples of the Belizean culture that are important to know before departing on your study abroad program.

Language

In Belize you’ll hear familiar words of the English language. In fact, we are the only English language-speaking country in Central America. While English is the official language of Belize, Kriol is the language that we all speak.

When you hear us, you know you’re in a country unlike any other. Even our most up-tight citizens sound relaxed. We have a Caribbean lilt and our words seem a bit shorter. But don’t worry, you’ll understand everything and we may teach you a few phrases you don’t know.

Here, even our language is a diverse adventure. Spanish, African-based Garifuna, Maya-Kekchi, Maya Mopan, Mandarin, German are just a few of the languages that form the unique dialects we speak throughout the country.

Here are a few different ways you’ll hear “good morning”

• “Gud Mawnin” – Kriol
• “Buiti Binafi” – Garifuna
• “Buenos dias” – Spanish
 

Food

  • Belizeans just love peppers and hot (pepper) sauce: habanero's and jalapenos, the hotter the better!
  • Rice and red beans with grated coconut
  • Corn and chicken tamales or tamalitos, commonly called "dukunu"
  • meats: iguana or "gibnut", pork, beef, chicken
  • fish
  • Side dishes are generally potato salad made from real Heinz salad dressing, the key ingredient that makes Belizean potato salad "Belijun", or coleslaw.
  • enchiladas and panades
  • Desert: coconut pie, lemon (merengue) pie, milk (caramel cake) and chocolate cake, bread pudding, sweet potato pound or cassava cake.
 

Norms and Faux Pas

  • If you invite someone to dinner, don't expect to split the bill
  • Learn to relax - slow down
  • It's normal for everything to start late
  • It's not cool to dance with someone's gf/ bf
  • Don't turn down a drink or plate of food
  • Don't assume everyone can read and write properly.

Local Transportation

Common modes of transportation in Belize are buses, taxis, private vehicles, motorcycles, and just walking. 

For this trip, a private vehicle will be provided for students' mode of transportation 
 
  


thingstoknowgeneralinfo


Packing Helpful Hints

  • Remember that everything you pack you will need to carry. If you are unable to carry it on your own, then you are packing too much!
  • Leave some room for any new items you may purchase while abroad.
  • Inquire about airline luggage regulations and pack accordingly.
  • Find out about dress customs in your destination and pack clothes that will help you blend-in with the locals.
  • Pack a nice outfit for special occasions.
  • Do not pack anything that you are not willing to lose.
  • If you are going to a place where the temperature will vary, pack clothes that you can layer.
  • Pack clothes that don’t require special wash.
  • You will probably walk more than the usual, bring comfortable shoes! In some destinations closed-toes shoes may be recommended due to possible injuries or infections.
  • Power adaptors and converters as applicable http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/world-electricity-guide.html
  • If you know your roommate, see if you can share some items.
  • Shower shoes
  • Camera
  • Backpack or tote bag for day field trips
  • Find out if you really need to bring a laptop. Keep in mind that a laptop can be stolen, so you may need to carry with you at all times.
  • Cell phone
Things to pack in your carry-on: Follow airline customs and regulations http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/3-1-1-carry-ons
  • Passport
  • Visa (if applicable)
  • Financial documents
  • Airline tickets (round trip)
  • Letter of acceptance in your study abroad program
  • Address where you will need to go as well as arrival instructions
  • Important phone number(s)
  • Prescription medications appropriately packed and identified
  • Glasses/contacts
  • Toiletries and a change of clothes in case of baggage or flight delays
  • Cell Phone
  • Pocket Dictionary

Flight Resources

Flying internationally can be an expensive purchase. As a student there are many discounts you can take advantage of. Remember to do your research and compare prices. If you have a credit card that as a point system, you may be able to use those points towards your airplane ticket.
 
Below are some websites we feel have the best prices for student travelers:

STA Travel 
Student Universe 

Parent Resources
Student Identity

Keeping in Touch

Keeping in touch with family and friends is becoming easier as WiFi is more prevalent in international cities. You no longer need to spent a ton of money to call home or go to an internet café. Downloading apps on your smartphone is becoming an essential resource for travelers. Some apps that you will find yourself needing:
  • Skype
  • Whatsapp
  • Viber
  • Facebook Messenger 

Money

Money, money, money… It is an important component to your study abroad program to have all your money matters taken care of before departing. From contacting your banks, to creating a budget and obtaining local currency, this is a step you should begin as early as possible.
 
It is important to contact your banks to let them know you are traveling internationally and for how long. If you do not let your banks know, not only will you not be able to use your credit cards or debit cards, your accounts will be frozen. Unfreezing accounts take time, time in which you will not have any money available for you to use.
 
Creating a budget for yourself is essential to not running out of money abroad and having to call friends or family for additional funds. Below is a budget worksheet to help you stay on track with your money.
 
Taking your credit card abroad is very common and probably the easiest way to make a purchase. Be aware of interest rates and international charges. Some credit cards charge you a lot for a single purchase while others have no international transaction fees. Call your bank to find out what the international transaction fee is on your card. Please note: International cards vary by card, not by company. For example, some Chase cards have zero fees, while another may have a very large fee. Read the guidelines carefully before deciding on a card.
 
Make sure your credit card has a designated pin number. You will need a pin number to make any purchase. If you do not have a pin, or if you are unsure, a quick call to your bank will clear up any confusion.
 
Currency exchange rates can be high and the interest rate at many shops, especially near or in airports or train station, can really hurt your budget. You will generally receive the best exchange rate at your bank. You should being $100 to $200 dollars in the local currency with you. Some banks have the most popular currency, like Euros on hand, while others have to be ordered. This process can take up to 2 or 3 weeks so be sure to do this in advance. If and when you need more cash, an ATM is your best option, but again be aware of transaction fees. Not only will the bank whose ATM you are using charge you, your bank will most likely charge you as well.
 
Below are a list of international credit cards we suggest:
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
  • BankAmericard Travel Rewards® Credit Card
  • Discover it® 12:12
  • Wells Fargo Propel World American Express
  • Citi ThankYou® Premier Card
  • Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card
  • Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card
  • Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business (all Capital One cards have zero international transaction fees - these are our favorite)


Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
January Intersession 2018 10/15/2017 11/01/2017 TBA TBA